Employee Training

Question: 

Is it the responsibility of the truss manufacturer to provide a sealed layout drawing for roof trusses?

Question: 

I am looking for a set of guidelines or “rules” for members of the SBCA. Are truss plants really not allowed to speak of business matters? I think that is unfair. I'm not going to call up our competitor and tell them that they aren't charging enough and taking all the business. I just want all the truss plants in my area to get together and decide how we are going to do business. We need to standardize the industry.

Question: 

We have been specifying laminated veneer lumber (LVL) beams for some time now. The plans usually state, “Beam to be engineered and supplied by truss manufacturer.” What kind of liability issues do I need to watch out for?

Question: 

What is the industry standard for ordering residential roof truss systems: Should the general contractor/builder field measure before ordering trusses or should he rely on the blueprint? Who is responsible for their accuracy – the plan service, the truss manufacturer, the builder/general contractor or the framing contractor?

Question: 

When you’re selling trusses through a lumberyard and the contractor calls to say that the “trusses don't fit correctly,” who has the ultimate responsibility for the trusses? I argue that the lumberyard is responsible since we have provided them with all the information on how the job was designed, even though they may or may not have passed this information on to the contractor.

Question: 

Is the truss designer or the building designer responsible for calculating snow drift loads on a roof system?

Question: 

My company supplied roof trusses for a hotel project. The building inspector shut the project down because the trusses were not designed to account for additional snowdrift loading. The construction plans did not contain any snowdrift loading information. The architect is claiming it is our responsibility to determine drift loading, therefore we must fix the problem. Do you have any documentation to help us dispute the architect’s claim?

Greg Griggs—southeast VP of component operations with Builders FirstSource—and BJ Louws—president of Louws Truss—both see untapped potential for productivity gains in inefficient plants. They introduced BCMC attendees to a few basic concepts of lean manufacturing: Kanban, Kaizen, 5 S and waste walks. They also made sure attendees left with a very clear picture of the value of good instructions and of the wasted effort in an inefficient workflow.

Forecasters are calling for above-average temperatures across much of the country this summer. Are you prepared to beat the heat?

A-1 takes a start-from-scratch approach to training new recruits.