Economic

We think of a housing bubble as house price growth that isn’t sustainable because it isn’t consistent with underlying fundamentals, like income and job growth. To determine whether a bubble exists, we must look at both factors.

Given the acute construction labor shortage that was already at play before recent natural disasters, reconstruction and its repercussions in residential real estate could pose yet another disaster.

The Census Bureau recently released 2016 multifamily completions data from the Survey of Construction. A total of 159,000 housing units, or 49 percent of all multifamily completions, were in buildings with 50 or more units, more than any other building type.

After hitting a new low in August, new home sales surged in September to their fastest pace in the past decade, according to the latest report released jointly by the U.S. Census Bureau and the Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Between August 2016 to August 2017, 37 states and the District of Columbia saw a growth in the total number of permits issued.

The U.S. economy these days is like an old and reliable car. It’s not going to set any speed records but it’s also not going to break down and leave people stranded.

While it's not the first time we have observed the BLS manipulate data, never before had we actually caught the Bureau Of Labor Statistics openly fabricating data. Until now.

BlueTarp Financial released today its Q2 2017 Building Supply Index. The Q2 2017 index value rose to 131.04 from 119.98 in Q2 2016 the most notable increase to-date.  

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin says he’s hopeful about getting a tax-code overhaul done by the end of this year after flatly stating he was “wrong” about finishing a deal by August.

A significant majority of housing data points to a market that has at least three to four years of strong growth ahead of it.