Building Codes

At the National Frame Building Association’s (NFBA) Frame Building Expo in Columbus, Ohio, Feb. 14 – 16, SBCA’s Vogt highlighted the importance of understanding the roles and responsibilities of the parties involved in projects using metal plate–connected wood trusses.

From a cost perspective, it was a record year for natural disasters in the United States in 2017. Hundreds of people lost their lives and thousands of buildings, many of them people’s homes, were destroyed.

The California Energy Commission (CEC) proposes to adopt changes to the Building Energy Efficiency Standards contained in the California Code of Regulations (CCR), Title 24, Part 6 (also known as the California Energy Code).

Thanks to a new program, young adults from low-income neighborhoods in Tennessee are receiving technical training in energy-efficient home construction practices, including weatherization, sustainability, and basic home upgrades.

The ICC recently released a summary of a code change to N1101.6 regarding the definition of an air barrier.

South Carolina is a leading state for fire deaths, but after an apartment fire in Port Royal this weekend, firefighters say sprinkler systems could get the state out of the top ten.

Des Moines, Iowa is in the process of updating their building codes so they are aligned with the 2018 International Building Code. Rick Parrino, SBCA Board Member and general manager of Plum Building Systems, was gearing up to submit comments and speak with his local officials about Section 1705.5.2 – Metal-plate-connected wood trusses:

Join Intertek at their facility in Elmendorf, TX from 10:30am to 2:30pm on Thursday, February 8th where they will be hosting a seminar that focuses on some of the building and construction issues most prevalent to the wood frame apartment community.

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo (D) unveiled an aggressive new energy efficiency initiative in his State of the State address.

Based on data from the preliminary energy savings analysis released by the DOE, the 2016 edition of Standard 90.1 results in 46.6 percent less source energy use and 43.6 percent less site energy use compared to the 1989 edition. A staggering reduction in 27 years.