Owens Corning Highlights Role of Insulation Contractor

Originally published by: Owens Corning CoLab ServicesOctober 18, 2018

The following article was produced and published by the source linked to above, who is solely responsible for its content. SBC Magazine is publishing this story to raise awareness of information publicly available online and does not verify the accuracy of the author’s claims. As a consequence, SBC cannot vouch for the validity of any facts, claims or opinions made in the article.

Derek Fowler was training to become a professional chef. Jose Gomez intended to become a lawyer. Through a bit of chance and a lot of hard work, both men found themselves becoming successful insulation contractors instead. Today, both operate thriving companies in the Arizona/Nevada market. And both say their success is due to their ability to help customers meet increasing energy codes on tight timelines and budgets.

For both Gomez and Fowler, a key factor in their success is their choice of insulation material

“Our market’s very price-sensitive, so I’m asked to install cellulose quite often,” said Fowler, co-owner of Aspen Insulation in Pahrump, NV. Oftentimes he says, builders just don’t have all the information on their options. “Once we show what we can do with fiberglass, it becomes a really easy decision.”

For instance, when a builder requested a conditioned attic with draped cellulose, “The architect stopped him mid-sentence and told him no,” citing concerns about settling, roof rot and other potential issues. As an alternative, Fowler recommended the Owens Corning® HPCA (High Performance Conditioned Attic) system. Because it uses fiberglass, there’s no settling, he explains. Plus, there are other benefits. “My favorite thing about it is that it eliminates thermal bridging, almost completely.”

Fowler recommended the Owens Corning High Performance Conditioned Attic system as an alternative to draped cellulose.
Fowler recommended the Owens Corning High Performance Conditioned Attic system as an alternative to draped cellulose.

For Jose Gomez, the preference for fiberglass starts with mitigating risk—for himself and his builder customers. Having previously worked on the construction litigation team for a national contracting company, he frequently came face-to-face with the liabilities of blown cellulose insulation.

Chief among his concerns is adding water to a product that will be in direct contact with wood for years to come.

“When you apply water to cellulose, it’s got to be vented for a certain period of time. I don’t have control over when they’re going to install the drywall,” said Gomez, who owns GI Building Products in Phoenix, AZ. Even in the arid Arizona climate, that’s a formula for mold. “So, from the business standpoint, do I want to carry that liability? The answer is no.”

Proponents of fiberglass insulation cite productivity and no added moisture or fire-retardants as top considerations for their choice.
Proponents of fiberglass insulation cite productivity and no added moisture or fire-retardants as top considerations for their choice.

With fiberglass, “You put the net in, you blow it in, you don’t have to worry about the moisture content in it. They can drywall as soon as you’re done.”

Gomez is quick to point out that success is about more than reducing your risks. It’s about doing business with integrity and delivering the best performance at the best value to help your customers be successful.

“I’m a very hands-on person and I make sure that what I promise to the builder, I fully deliver at the most competitive pricing, using the best products in the market.”

What insulating approach is right for you? Owens Corning CoLab™ services can help you learn more about your options and the building science behind them so you can insulate to a higher standard for less.