Legislative

At the end of last month, the U.S. Supreme Court announced a decision that could have far-reaching effects in the residential building industry. 

A lumber yard is suing a Houston home builder and his company, alleging failure to pay for completed work.

The Connecticut General Assembly Public Safety Committee has rejected a state Senate bill that would authorize local governments to mandate fire sprinklers in all new one- and two-family homes.

House Bill 1472, Fire Safety Construction Act of 2016, has been introduced in the Maryland legislature.

A federal agency has proposed training standards for entry-level commercial truck and bus drivers that are intended to improve safety.

 The Department of Commerce imposed tariffs of as much as 266 percent on imports of cold-rolled steel after determining they were priced unfairly.

Concrete Construction’s editor Bill Palmer speaks with Jim Rogers of Arizona State University to discuss the latest OSHA requirements regarding injury reporting. 

Historically, hundreds of thousands of small businesses have offered millions of employees Health Reimbursement Arrangements, or HRAs, to help with rising healthcare costs. The IRS is now punishing that approach.

It's déjà vu all over again for senators, who will return to the Capitol later today to see if the bipartisan energy bill and an aid package for Flint, Mich., can find their way back to the floor this week.

On February 10, 2016, we reported that the Supreme Court stayed the Clean Power Plan (CPP) pending review by the DC Circuit Court of Appeals.